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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN3 06/13/2014
Goodlatte: As we all know, last week marked the one-year anniversary of the first leak of classified material by Edward Snowden, a criminal betrayal of his country and arguably the most significant leak in U.S. history. Over the past year, the House Judiciary Committee conducted aggressive oversight of the NSA bulk collection program and spearheaded house passage of the USA Freedom Act. This bipartisan legislation reforms controversial national security programs and provides expanded oversight and transparency of America's intelligence gathering. Although the leaks by Edward Snowden may have been the impetus for congressional reforms, the passage of this bipartisan legislation in no way condones or excuses his actions. The detrimental consequences of what he did may not yet be fully realized.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Goodlatte: The bill passed by this house honors the fourth amendment and protects the rights of American citizens. At the same time, Islamic radical terrorists are on the march in Iraq and the leader has publicly threatened to attack America. Syria has become a vortex of jihaddists from across the globe and the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of Homeland Security have warned of the growing threat these jihaddists pose to our own homeland. State control has collapsed in Libya and rival gangs of radical terrorists have established safe havens that rival those in Afghanistan prior to 2001. Meanwhile in Afghanistan, the Taliban, Haqqani network, and al qaeda continue to fight. Moreover the administration has released the Taliban, five from Guantanamo, emboldening the terrorists. The terrorist danger is grave and growing. The terrorist threat is not contained overseas.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 06/19/2014
Goodlatte: The U.S. homeland remains a prime aspiration and target. This amendment would create a blind spot for the intelligence community tracking terrorists with direct connections to the U.S. homeland. This amendment would impose greater restrictions on the intelligence community's ability to protect national security than constitutionally required and create an impediment to the government's ability to locate threat information already in its possession. Such an impediment would put American lives at risk of another terrorist attack. I urge my colleagues to reject this amendment, stand by the legislation passed, it is also being considered in the senate, and there will be further negotiations, but this, this contradicts the intent of the house and endangers America's national security.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Goodlatte: As we speak, thousands -- no, millions of telephone metadata records are flowing into the N.S.A. on a daily basis. 24 hours a day, seven days a week, despite changes to the N.S.A. bulk telephone metadata program announced by President Obama last year, the bulk collection of the records has not ceased and will not cease unless and until congress acts to shut it down. Not even last week's decision by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals will end this collection. The responsibility falls to us, and today we must answer the call and the will of the American people to do just that. When we set out to reform this program one year ago, I made the pledge to my colleagues in congress and to the American people that Americans' liberty and America's security can coexist. That these fundamental concepts are not mutually exclusive. They are embedded in the very fabric that makes this nation great
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Goodlatte: H.R. 2048, The U.S.A. Freedom Act protects these pillars of American democracy. It affirmatively ends the indiscriminant bulk collection of telephone metadata, but it does much further than this. It prohibits the bulk collection of all records under section 215 of the Patriot Act as well as under the FISA Pen Register trap and trace device statute and the national security letters statute. In place of the current bulk telephone metadata program the U.S.A. Freedom Act creates a targeted program that allows the intelligence community to collect noncontent call detail records held by the telephone companies that only with the prior approval of the FISA court and subject to the special selection term limitation.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Goodlatte: The records provided to the government in response to queries will be limited to two hops, and the government's handling of any records it acquires will be governed by minimization procedures approved by the FISA court. The U.S.A. Freedom Act prevents government overreach by strengthening the definition of specific selection term. The mechanism used to prohibit bulk collection. To ensure the government can collect the information it needs to further a national security investigation while also prohibiting large-scale indiscriminant collection such as data from an entire state, city or zip code. The U.S.A. Freedom Act strengthens civil liberties and privacy protections by authorizing the FISA court to appoint an individual to serve as amicus curiae from a pool of experts to advise the court on matters of privacy and civil liberties, communications technology and other technical or legal matters.
Bob Goodlatte
Representative (R-VA), Chairman, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 08/13/2015
Goodlatte: It also codifies important procedures for recipients of national security letters to challenge nondisclosure requests. The bill increases transparency by requiring declassification of all significant FISA court opinions and provides procedures for certified questions of law to the FISA court of review and to the United States Supreme Court. Additionally, H.R. 2048 requires the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence to provide the public with detailed information about how the intelligence community uses these national security authorities and provides even more robust transparency reporting by America's technology companies. The U.S.A. Freedom Act enhances America's national security by closing loopholes that make it difficult for the government to track foreign terrorists and spies as they enter or leave the country.
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